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Deja Vu

I wonder if Denzel Washington is fed up with being typecast as "the serious bloke"?

The films starts with a terrorist attack on a passenger ferry, resulting in the death of over 500 people. The difference in this incident, however, is that Denzel has the ability to investigate and watch the event happening all over again because he gets teamed up with a group of propeller-heads who have created a wormhole that looks back four days into the past. Sci-fi-tastic!

This is where the real investigation starts, as the technology employed gives him the ability to follow anyone and everyone around and look at what they're doing in the leadup to the event. In particular, he pays the most attention to a random woman who was killed before the bombing in the belief that by finding her killer, he'll find the bomber.

The film is very well shot, but my problem with it is that the plot was far too predictable. I could have told you the last forty-five minutes before seeing it - and I wouldn't have been far wrong. Even as I tell you the story, you can imagine what the investigator is going to try, and herein lies the issue. The film has lots of style, but no real substance. The plot is unoriginal, which makes it known as Deja Vu for perhaps all the wrong reasons - we've seen this stuff somewhere else before.

That is not to say that the film isn't a reasonable watch. It is. It's just unfortunate that an otherwise mediocre title such as this is being considered more as a gem at a time of year when there are plenty of turds to pick from. Filmfour's score of 4/5 is a little bit too generous for my liking. However, that's another matter. I wonder if since their change to a free-to-view channel, they have lost some objectivity in their reviews for fear of pissing off their advertisers, but I digress.

On a chilly December evening, though, you could do worse than see this if you've got little else to do. Just don't expect too much.

Filmfour review link here. (*clicky*)

Overall: 3/5
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